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Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)
forward and he's allowed the u.n. security council, russia and china to determine our policy. all these are acts of weaknesses as opposed to making clear and we haven't worked closely with our allies as evidence by the recent u.n. meeting when the president had time for whoopi goldberg but couldn't meet with netanyahu. >> one of the criticisms, this appears to be management of the arab spring. that is a big part. does governor romney think it was a mistake to push mubarak out? >> what he has said is that we have forces that are of extre extremism and forces of moderation an we should be aligned and help those forces. a difference in egypt is one that's on the table today. governor romney says we should have conditions. we shouldn't write off a billion dollar debt. >> but going back to mubarak. was that a mistake? does governor romney believe that's a mistake? >> how it was handled was a mistake. >> pushing mubarak out was a mistake? >> let me give you the answer. first of all, for two years, president obama cut support of u.s. assistance for democracy and civil society in egypt, s
to read. i'd say i spent during the u.n. week i spent two hours at a tea that president ahmadinejad held for aumb of boo authors and i emerged from it more confused about where iran is today than i think i was when i went in. i think the iranians would like a cost-free way out and i reported last week on the details of an iranian offer, a nine-point plan in which basically the u.s. lifts all the sanctions and then at the end the iranians suspended the production of the fuel that you could turn into a bomb the fastest. this isn't going anywhere because the u.s. doesn't want to give up its leverage. >> rose: right. >> but what it does tell you is that the sanions m finly be getting the attention of the iranian leadership we don't know whether it's getting to the point that they would actually begin to carve back on the nuclear program and that's going to be the big test. the iranians have basically made a clear they don't want to conduct any negotiations until the end of our presidential elections. >> rose: right. >> and who could blame them? because they wouldn't think that a deal preside
speaks, the ambassador will speak to us. former ambassador to the u.n. and advisor to the romney campaign. so he's going -- i know i read some excerpts. he's delivering the speech right now. we haven't heard what he's actually saying at the moment but in reading some of the excerpts, i know he will be -- he will say the u.s. should be more assertive i guess in the syrian conflict. what should we be doing that we're not doing with regard to syria? >> well i think governor romney points out that the policy that the obama administration has followed the past 18 months has been a failure. the conflict continues. we relied on russia to help us find a way to ease the dictatorship out of power. that was never going to work. as a consequence with russia and iran still supporting assad, we have had this on going battle with probably over 20,000 civilians killed. what governor romney recommends in the speech -- in the speech is that we carefully select leaders in the opposition who we can trust and see if it is possible to support them. connell: but getting involved ourselves is not realistic, is i
straight? former u.n. ambassador john bolton is here. so, are you satisfied? >> no, look, the administration made up its mind what the reality was, whether it was engagedin a coverup, whether it was ideology that dominated the view, whether it was incompetence, at this point, we don't know the answer to that. but we know one thing, unmistakeably. they were flatly wrong. they got it wrong before the attack, they got it wrong after the attack. they are getting it wrong now. so we psychoanalyze them all we want, but this is a demonstration, these people cannot be left in the same room with national security. >> greta: you say they are getting wrong, they have got it wrong, but it's more than that. why are they still dog it? why are they still trying to sell us that? jay carney today, in the statements he made today, initial assessment and the immediate aftermath of the attack in benghazi were made, it was a government-wide assessment that the foundation of what ambassador rice said, was the video. that is patently wrong, last night the state department said in a conference c
and arm syrian opposition groups so they can defend themselves. while a u.n. investigation found regime forces most likely responsible for the killings and said that rebel forces were also guilty of murder and torture and several radical islamic groups emerged in syria. president obama recently promised to send the syrian rebels another $45 million. the u.s. already shipped food, medicine and communications gear but no lethal weapons. some former military officials say it is time to do more. >> that does not mean the u.s. should put boots on the ground. but our leadership should be felt, it should be visible. >> reporter: now, by most estimates, the syrian regime has thousands of battle tanks and a regular supply of ammunition of iran to fight that kind of armament you're talking about giving the rebels things like shoulder-fired rockets and there is a concern that sending those types of weapons in could fall in to the hands of terrorists. that's the big difference with president obama's regime or his administration i should say. he's been advocating trying to keep it a low intensity co
in syria. i haven't seen the u.n. meeting so frequently opening committees to see what happened and syria as a double standard as you compare what is happening in syria if you to what is happening in syria entering israel. to achieve world peace, not a piece of paper, we have to weight and find a viable part. >> my name is richard corliss. i'm actually a christian in my background is representing persecuted christian communities in places like egypt and baghdad and iran. my question is i have been fortunate concluded that no approach reason to achieve the middle east peace is unsound, basically not possible to achieve. i have 10 million cop to christians in egypt who are on the no right to exist list. the idea for israel is to be secure and permanent jewish state. it doesn't seem that that has happened. unfortunately concluding that they never have been more likely than not. i think we may just have to think out of the box away from all the current options. >> i think, and about in my book it has nothing to do with the settlement. i know to understand and to agree never to south sudan to
of heated disputes at the u.n. only a new president will bring the chance to begin anew. there's a longing for american leadership in the middle east, and it's not unique to that region. in asia and across the pacific where china's recent assertiveness is sending chills throughout that region and here where our neighbors in latin america want to reduce the failed ideology of hugo chavez and the castro brothers and deepened ties with the united states on trade and energy and security. in all these places the question is asked where does america stand? i know many americans are asking a different question. why us? i know many americans are asking whether our country today with our ailing economy, and our massive debt, and after 11 years of war is still capable of leading. i believe that if america doesn't lead, others will. others who don't share our interests and our values, and the world would grow darker. for our friends and for us. america's security and the cause of freedom cannot afford four more years like the last four years. i'm running for president because i believe the leader of
be a negotiation process has devolved into a series of heated disputes at the u.n. in this old conflict as in every challenge we face in the middle east, only a new president will bring the chance to begin anew. there is a longing for american leadership in the middle east. it's not unique to that region. it's broadly felt by america's friends and allies in other parts of the world as well. in europe, where putin's russia casts a long shadow over young democracies and where our oldest allies have been told per pivoting away from them. in asia and across the pacific where china's assertiveness is sending chills throughout the region and in our hemisphere where neighbors in latin america want to resist hugo chavez, the castro brothers and deepen ties with the united states on trade, energy and security. but in all of these places just as in the middle east the question is asked, where does america stand. i know many americans are asking, why us? i know many americans are asking whether our country today with our ailing economy and massive debt and after 11 years of war is still capable of leading. i
at the u.n.? >> when mitt romney left the campaign for exhaustion, barack obama was putting in 19 hour days. jenna: hold on a second. brad and sean, i think, i think we've -- >> that is ridiculous, sean. that is insulting. jenna: if you're a presidential fund raise and you also can't be tired? is that what you're saying. >> that is what sean is suggesting. >> i think there is a difference --. jenna: if you will, brad, talk about these priorities. one of the messages that seems to becoming out of all this talk about the debate is that the president did not prioritize the practice and preparedness you need to enter into the debate. that is why he didn't look as good as some might expect. how do you answer the criticism the president did not look prepared? >> i think if you go back and look at his answers i think he certainly looked he certainly looked prepared. mitt romney had sharper and more energetic performance. it was, as robert gibbs said a performance. it is easy to do well in a debate when you're not willing to confront your own policies honestly. he lied about his tax plan. he lied a
established at the u.n. which gets to the point you made, bill, about the fact it's a deeply seated value in a lot of culture. we go here and to julie. >> thank you for your insightful presentation. >> your name. >> [inaudible] and my question goes to mr. mr. hisham melhem. said that the muslim brotherhood is probusiness and socially conservative if i recall correctly. what where does it exactly place the next administration here in the u.s. and american perception as to how they actually perceive the muslim brotherhood or the freedom and justice party and specifically as far as being a unique element -- such in the family or islamist as you put it and as your emphasis it is politics and economic not necessarily religion and culture. thank you. >> maybe the republican vote piers. you can hand the microphone right in the -- thank you. my question for doctor, i'm wondering how much being informed -- have you been able to look at responses the difference between sophisticated an novemberist when you provide more information, for instance, instead of talking about egypt's role and stability o
as this happened who did they send on the sunday talk shows? the u.n. ambassador. i have no doubt in my mind that clearly as these things are happening the white house is involved. when you have terrorist-type activities the white house is involved. no doubt about that. megyn: it many supposition. it's not that somebody has leaked that to you and you have seen a document. >> what you will see as early as today as as late as tomorrow, official on the ground requesting more materials. there were two bomb cans of been gassive our facility. i'm not aware of anywhere else in the world where our physical facility was actually bombed and it was bombed twice. you had the british ambassador, there was an assassination attempt. and coming up on 9/11 the white house says there was no actionable intelligence that there may be problems in benghazi? megyn: why would we do that? you have got whistleblowers telling you the requests for increases security were being made to the state department and you say they were not only told no, but that security was reduced. why would we do that? >> my personal belief,
'm against -- >> okay. >> just i want the u.n. start to enact a law to stop the abuse of the free speech against other religions. >> okay. so a question about the possibility of blasphemy law or norm established at the u.n. which gets to the point you made, bill, about the fact that this is a deeply-seeded value in a lot of cultures. and then we go here and then to julie. >> first of all, thank you very much for your insightful presentation. >> your name, please? >> my dame is dorgan. my question goes to mr.melhem. i think it was said that the muslim brotherhood is pro-business and socially conservative, if i recall correctly. where does that exactly place the next administration here in the u.s. and american perceptions as to how they actually perceive of the muslim brotherhood or morsi's freedom and justice party specifically as far as it being a unique element identifying itself as such in the family of islamists as you put it, and as you emphasized, it is politics and economics, not necessarily religion and culture. thank you very much. >> okay. so maybe the republican voters. you ca
. his birth certificate is a lie. why have we gone to the u.n. all the time to get this one world tin? i want th -- one world thing? read the rise and fall of the third reich and you will see this guy is paralleling everything that hitler did. a special army and so on. host: thanks for the call. i do want to clear up one thing. the president has not talked about his father, but his grandfather did serve in world war ii and his speech is available on our website, c- span.org. guest: i think it goes to show the polarization in this country that we thought might go away upon barack obama's election. this country was heavily divided during the george w. bush years. the partisanship still exists today, both sides. ohio is an example of where getting out the vote will be an interesting barometer for both sides. in 2010, republicans swept every state. less than 12 months ago we had a referendum on senate bill 5, highly controversial, where governor kasich ltd. unions' right to collectively bargain. the state went to vote on that. a 51% ohioans voted to repeal it. this state swings and its wings
speech or religion? >> and question about the possibility of the norm established at the u.n. it gives to the point of this is a deeply seated issue. >> thank you for your presentation. my question goes to you. in a recent panel that happened over here, i think he said the muslim brotherhood is pro- business in fiscal conservative. how does that play as to how they actually perceive the muslim brotherhood or morsi's party as being part of a unique element? there is politics. >> the kenyan the microphone right there. thank you. >> i am wondering how much being informed of fax responses. have you -- effects responses. have you been able to look at the difference between sophisticate analysis? when you provide more information, and a question like that if you had said egypt allowing u.s. warships to go through the suez canal, when you ask a question that way does it end up affecting responses? >> we have four fascinating questions. >> let me just respond to a couple of them. i confess when the young man asked his question i had a response very much like tammy's. do we have a party like th
for the u.s. or the syria or the u.n. or really anybody else to talk to about cutting a deal or finding a way out other than continuing bloodshed. can you talk about the political opposition? >> that's a great question as i said in the talk. the only absentee is the great debating society. the national congress, the opposition group created in the aftermath of the revolution. these guys have no support on the ground. people don't know them. their names and faces, inside the country, and they think we don't care. they are not in the country. they distributed aid, and they are quiet, but they are not anywhere close to the front lines, not gaining what they need, there's a lot of fighting, and a lot resigned. the islamists are taking over, certain facts are supported, you know, qatar and the french are trying to really mold them into some type of cohesive organization, and it's not working or going anywhere. i don't think you'll see anything out of the snc come out. that said, there are certain people that, you know, i think would be good leaders, the people i've met with good ideas. they
Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)